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EFFT Articles:

  1. Hirschfeld, M.R. & Wittenborn, A.K. (2016). “Emotionally focused family therapy and play therapy with children whose parents are divorced.” Journal of Divorce and Remarriage, 57(2), 133-150.
  2. Willis, A.B., Haslam, D.R., & Bermudez, J.M. (2016). “Harnessing the power of play in EFFT with preschool children.” Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 42(4), 673-687.
  3. Stavrianopoulos, K., Faller, G., & Furrow, J.L. (2014). “Emotionally Focused Family Therapy: Facilitating Change within a Family System.” Journal of Couple & Relationship Therapy, 13(1), 25-43.
  4. Schade, L. C. (2013). “Non-suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI): A Case for Using Emotionally Focused Family Therapy.” Contemporary Family Therapy, 35(3), 568–582.
  5. Palmer, G., & Efron, D. (2007). “Emotionally Focused Family Therapy: Developing the Model.” Journal of Systemic Therapies, 26(4), 17-24.
  6. Furrow, J. L., & Palmer, G. (2007). “EFFT and blended families: Building bonds from the inside out.” Journal of Systemic Therapies, 26, 44-58.
  7. Efron, D., & Bradley, B. (2007). “Emotionally focused therapy (EFT) and emotionally focused family therapy (EFFT): A challenge/opportunity for systemic and post-systemic therapists.” Journal of Systemic Therapies, 26(4), 1–4.
  8. Wittenborn, A.K., Faber, A.J., Harvey, A.M., & Thomas, V.K. (2006). “Emotionally focused family therapy and play therapy techniques.” The American Journal of Family Therapy, 34(4), 333-342.
  9. Efron, D. (2004). “The use of emotionally focused family therapy in a children’s mental health center.” Journal of Systemic Therapies, 23(3), 78–90.
  10. Johnson, S.M., Maddeaux, C. & Blouin, J. (1998). “Emotionally focused family therapy for bulimia: Changing attachment patterns.” Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 35, 238-247.

EFFT Chapters:

  1. Furrow, J.L., & Faller, G. (2019). “Emotionally Focused Family Therapy.” In L. Lorås, & O. Ness (Eds.), Norwegian Handbook of Family Therapy, pp. 357-368. Fagbokforlaget: Bergen.
  2. Aikin, N., Aikin, P. (2018). “Hold Me Tight/Let Me Go Enrichment Program for Families and Teens.” In J. Lebow, A. Chambers, D. Breunlin (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy. Cham, Switzerland: Springer Science and Business Media.
  3. Furrow, J.L., & Palmer, G. (2017). “Emotionally focused family therapy.” In J. Lebow, A. Chambers, D. Breunlin (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy. Cham, Switzerland: Springer Science and Business Media.
  4. Palmer, G. (2017). “Emotionally Focused Family Therapy for Stepfamilies: Building Security for Children in the Face of Complexity and Change.” In Jennifer Fitzgerald (Ed.), Foundations for Couples’ Therapy: Research for the Real World, pp. 395-403. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge.
  5. Furrow, J.L., & Palmer, G. (2011). “Emotionally focused therapy for remarried couples: Making new connections and facing competing attachments.” In J. Furrow, S. Johnson, & B. Bradley (Eds.), The EFT Casebook: New directions in treating couples, pp. 271-294. New York, NY: Routledge.
  6. Bradley, B., & Johnson, S.M. (2005). “Task analysis of couple and family change events.” In D. Sprenkle & F. Piercy (Eds.), Research methods in family therapy, 2nd Edition, pp. 254-271. New York, NY: Guilford Press.
  7. Furrow, J.L., Bradley, B., & Johnson, S.M. (2004). “Emotionally focused family therapy with complex family systems.” In V. Bengston, A. Acock, K. Allen, P. Dilworth Anderson, & D. Klien (Eds.), Sourcebook of family theory and research, pp. 220 – 225. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  8. Johnson, S.M., & Boisvert, C. (2002). “Treating couples and families from the humanistic perspective: More than symptoms, more than solutions.” In D. Cain & J. Seeman (Eds.), Humanistic psychotherapies: Handbook of research and practice, pp. 309-338. Washington, DC: APA Press.
  9. Johnson, S.M. & Lee, A. (2000).“Emotionally focused family therapy: Restructuring attachment.” In C.E. Bailey (Ed.), Children in therapy: Using the family as a resource, pp. 112-136. New York, NY: Norton.

EFFT Books:

For links, where available, to translated/foreign-language versions, see EFT Books and Non-English EFT Publications pages on this website.

  1. Furrow, J.L., Johnson, S.M., Bradley, B., Brubacher, L., Campbell, T.L., Kallos-Lily, V., Palmer, G., Rheem, K., & Woolley, S. (2022). Becoming an Emotionally Focused Therapist: The Workbook, 2nd edition. New York, NY: Brunner Routledge.Johnson, S.M., Bradley, B., Furrow, J.L., Lee, A., Palmer, G., Tilley, D., & Woolley, S. (2005). Becoming an Emotionally Focused Couple Therapist: The Workbook, 1st edition. New York, NY: Brunner Routledge.
    This 2005, 1st edition, has been translated into Korean, Russian and Turkish, and is in press in Korean, and Russian.

     

  2. Johnson, S.M. (2020). The Practice of Emotionally Focused Therapy: Creating Connection, 3rd edition. New York, NY: Brunner /Routledge.
    This 2020 3rd edition has been translated into Dutch, Spanish and Swedish, and is in the process of being translated into Chinese (simplified), French, German, Korean and Italian.The 2004 2nd edition, “The Practice of Emotionally Focused Couple Therapy: Creating Connection,“ has been translated into Chinese (complex), Dutch, Finnish, German, Hungarian, Italian, Korean, Romanian, Russian, Spanish and Turkish.

     

  3. Furrow, J., Palmer, G., Johnson, S.M., Faller, G., & Palmer-Olsen, L. (2019) Emotionally Focused Family Therapy: Restoring Connection and Promoting Resilience. New York, NY: Brunner/Routledge.
    This book is in the process of being translated into Russian. 
  4. Johnson, S.M. (2019). Attachment Theory in Practice — Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) for Individuals, Couples and Families. New York, NY: Guilford Press.
    This book has been translated into Danish and Dutch, and is in the process of being translated into Chinese (complex), Chinese (simplified), Finnish, German, Greek, Italian, Korean, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Swedish and Turkish. 
  5. Aikin, N., & Aikin, P.A. (2017). Hold Me Tight®/Let Me Go Facilitators’ Guide for Small Groups. Ottawa, Canada: ICEEFT.
    This booklet/guide has been translated into Farsi and Norwegian, and is in press in Chinese (simplified), Danish, Dutch, German, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Spanish and Swedish, with the slides also being translated in Hebrew.
    NOTE: This book is part of the Hold Me Tight®/Let Me Go Relationship Education & Enhancement Program for Families with Teens. The program includes the books, Hold Me Tight and HMT®/LMG Facilitators’ Guide, and the DVD, Hold Me Tight®/Let Me Go: Conversations for Connection.